Tuesday, August 01, 2006

KOKUM SHARBAT....

This is my entry for MONTHLY MINGLE # 3 –BEAT THE HEAT

My entry is for kokum sharbat or kokum juice
I have collected information about kokum so that our fellow food lovers know what kokum is I sourced the information from www.epicenter.com.

KOKUM
The kokum is native to the western coastal regions of southern India and rarely seen beyond this area. Even in India, it is used only in the regional cuisines of Gujarat, Maharashtra and several southern states where large glasses of kokum sherbet are downed during parched summer months. In this region, the sweltering heat demands refrigerant (cooling) ingredients in food and drink. Kokum is well known to counteract the heat.



Spice Description
Kokum is dark purple to black, sticky and with curled edges. The fruit is often halved and dried, so that the dried seeds are visible in their chambers like a citrus fruit. It is usually available as a dried rind, resembling a thick plum skin. When added to food it imparts a pink to purple colour and sweet/sour taste.

Preparation and Storage
Similar to tamarind, kokum skins are usually available as dried rind or fruit, and infused in hot water. The deeper the colour, the better the kokum. It will keep in an airtight jar for about a year.

Culinary Uses
Kokum has the same souring qualities as tamarind, especially enhancing coconut-based curries or vegetable dishes like potatoes, okra or lentils. Kokum is especially used with fish curries, three or four skins being enough to season an average dish. It is also included in chutneys and pickles. The skins are not usually chopped but are added completely to the dish. Seasoning should have been checked, as they are quite salty.

Attributed Medicinal Properties
As mentioned in the introduction, kokum’s refrigerant properties are well known. It is useful as an infusion, or by direct application, in skin ailments such as rashes caused by allergies. Kokum butter is an emollient helpful in the treatment of burns scalds and Culinary Uses
Kokum has the same souring qualities as tamarind, especially enhancing coconut-based curries or vegetable dishes like potatoes, okra or lentils. Kokum is especially used with fish curries, three or four skins being enough to season an average dish. It is also included in chutneys and pickles. The skins are not usually chopped but are added completely to the dish. Seasoning should have been checked, as they are quite salty.


KOKUM

KOKUM SHARBAT

Take ½ cup of kokum
Soak it in warm sugar syrup for about 5-6 hours.
Crush the kokum with your hands so that you get the juice.
You can even add only warm water to the kokum and add sugar after you take the concentrate.
Take one part of kokum juice or syrup and add 3 parts water
Add sugar (I add about 3 spoons per glass)
Add ¼ tsp roasted and powdered jeera powder
You can add a pinch of pepper powder too, which is optional.
Add salt to taste
Stir and drink this chilled.
It’s a remedy for hot days.It makes you cool!!!!!!!

4 comments:

Sumitha said...

Kokum Sharbat,so cool!:)

shilpa said...

Hi Mahek,
I love kokum sharbat. Used to have it a lot in India. Unfortunately, I could not find kokum anywhere here :(.

sweety said...

I M A GRET LOVER OF COCUM SHARBAT

Vishku said...

Hi
Is this instant or can we keep this for long if so how long... Sugar syrup how much water do you add?